Tomb Raiders

11 Feb

FireShot Capture 061 - Lost Stadiums on Twitter_ _Springfield Park, during demolition #WAFC _ - twitter.com

I can remember watching a programme on the telly years back about the old Wigan Casino and its fall from grace following a mysterious fire, yes another unexplained fire. This bloke a Casino regular from down south went down for a final look when they were demolishing the building and asked the demolition men could he have the iconic Wigan Casino Club sign. They let him have it money exchanging hands and he has it stored in his house somewhere.

Another couple bought some of the wooden dance floor and had it laid in their kitchen in a small terraced house in Wigan. Andy and Fiona Nevin now live in Melbourne Australia but they left the kitchen floor intact. Andrew & Fiona bought the flooring for 80 quid; Andrew was a hairdresser just round the corner from the Casino. They have some of the wooden floor in Melbourne and the rest is in storage.

Sometimes it’s just hard to let go of the things we love I suppose. From my childhood I have three special items that mean the world to me. One is a small electric train set that I got when I was around 10 years old. It was an expensive present back then and it never expanded beyond a simple oval track. I did get accessories from time to time like a station platform and a level crossing but it enjoyed its finest moments running over my little Airfix soldiers in a sadistic version of Von Ryan’s Express.

My second item is a relic of the Space Age tin toys that were imported from Japan in the early 60’s. Capsule 5 had flashing lights and an astronaut that moved back and forth in his seat. If it ran into a wall it would back up and change direction across the kitchen floor. It liked an oilcloth surface rather than carpet much to the pet dog’s distain. This toy is almost 60 years old and as I look through the Perspex window of the spacecraft at that old astronaut he hasn’t changed a bit. When he looks back at me he sees an old bloke who he remembers being a wide eyed eight year old kid who dreamt of things that were always just out of reach.

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The third thing I have is my trusty penknife. Every kid carried a knife back in the day and I can’t honestly say if that contributed to a lot of stabbing but it didn’t seem like it. Although in the week I was born a seven year old stabbed another kid in the heart with a knife on a field in Ince killing him stone dead. We tended to use knives for carving our name in wood a lot. The house I lived in at Worsley Hall had my name carved into the window frame of my bedroom along with the suits of a deck of playing cards. I didn’t get into trouble for that but I would have gone bananas if my kids had done the same. The old home has plastic double glazing now so that’s another piece of my history cast aside.

We also played Splits a lot when we were kids throwing knifes at each other’s feet to see if we could get them to do the splits. My knife was from Germany made in a place called Solingen which was a famous place for knife making though I only found that out in recent years. It has a real bone handle and many other attachments such as a corkscrew, can opener and one of those things for getting stones from a horses hoof and who can manage without one of those?

All this reminiscing got me thinking about some of the stuff that went missing when we left Springfield Park. Let’s face it that was a free for all that was undignified and disrespectful to the old lady that had served us so well over the years. Everyone had the same idea; we all wanted a keepsake from the old ground to remember her by. It started with the pitch an obvious place to start with a piece of the hallowed turf. Penalty spot? Forget it that was dug up quicker than an old joke in a Jimmy Tarbuck* interview when a showbiz person snuffs it. (*The real one not our esteemed editor) The same went for the centre circle so sod it any bit of sod would have to do. Some went for the advertising hoardings around the ground which were putting up a little resistance to being moved so that you ended up with half an advert for Rathbones bread.

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The morning after the last game at Springfield Park was when the real Tomb Raiders entered the fray. I went down with the wife and kids for a final look at the ground and I was surprised to see all the gates were open. We entered the ground and doors had been kicked in, leaflets scattered, just pieces of debris everywhere. Up in the Phoenix Stand figures could be seen swarming over the seats so we went up for a look at what they were doing. They had screwdrivers and were taking seats from the stand and I was bitten by temptation like Adam with that dammed apple.

“Erm can I borrow your screwdriver mate?” I said to one bloke making off with around four seats connected together. He reluctantly passed it to me and no sooner had it entered my hand than a shout went out from the pitch below “Get out that stand now!” It was Brenda Spencer with a couple of coppers “There’s an amateur cup final on here this week” she protested in one final futile attempt to stop the demolition. I looked down at Brenda she was surrounded by holes made by human moles: great swathes of the pitch were currently in pride of place in people’s gardens and backyards across the town. Good luck to the bloke who had to take a penalty from the spot two miles away. 

Brenda was almost crying with frustration and it brought me to my senses. I handed the screwdriver back to the bloke and made my out the stand with nothing but shame. The amateur cup final didn’t take place not that I cared; I knew a lot of the lads who played local league football and quite a few of them couldn’t stand latics or was I just jealous that they got to play at Springfield Park, my field of dreams and I didn’t? A few days later the real vandals moved in setting fire to the stand and this time the old Phoenix was too weary to rise again succumbing to the flames.

Could the club have handled the demise of Springfield Park better? Most certainly but then again so could the fans. It wasn’t pretty what happened and it’s such a shame that nothing was taken to the new ground when we moved. Maybe a crush barrier like they have in the football museum? Somewhere our younger fans could stand for photographs with a background mural of the old terrace. An old turnstile perhaps? The biggest crime for me was letting the Wigan Athletic AFC sign go that was proudly displayed on the outside of the main stand. This would have looked magnificent illuminated inside one of the DW’s main rooms. Imagine it on the wall in the supporters bar, such a shame.

However we are not completely alone in this ransacking of old stadiums so don’t beat yourself up too much. Just recently Spurs fans attacked the seating at the old White Hart Lane ground to take a souvenir home and in Sweden 5000 turned up one day to take home some of the AIK Stockholm ground. One man decided to go for a more unusual souvenir and after much deliberation decided a urinal would be ideal. He tried to convince his wife when he turned up at home with a piss stone that it would make an ideal place to put flower arrangements. Sadly the toilet still reeked of pee so his wife vetoed the idea and told him to put it on the Swedish equivalent of Ebay. Probably still on there if you want to put a bid in…

At the end of the day some of the best things aren’t tangible. The sight of floodlights cutting across the night sky, a whiff of wintergreen when you are stood against the perimeter wall, the touch of a players shirt when he’s taking a throw in, the smell of Old Holborn from your Dad’s tobacco tin, the steam rising from the old tea shop under the stand. Sunsets over the away end, flasks of coffee or something more spirited, the bloke behind you with a transistor radio to his ear, occasionally giving you football scores like the shipping forecast Arsenal 2 Liverpool 1, United now losing 1-0…

You carry these things in your heart, in your very soul, they run through your arteries, tragedy and triumph, warmth and cold, lost and found, shared and missed. We live apart you and I but we share the same house, we are family at the end of the day and the best families stick together. God bless good people and see you soon…

Tony Topping

 

 Tony that piece in the mudhutter is marvelous. Was recounting a funny story with my old man over Christmas about the demise of Springy. After the Chesterfield game no one ever thought we would have got in to the play offs, indeed some distant relation had organised a wedding for the day of the home leg of the play-offs. Much to the anger and disdain of my Mum and Nan me and my old fella went to Springfield resplendent in our suits. Coming out afterwards the vultures had already ripped down the signs off the turnstiles. I found the Junior Latics one on the floor, insisted that we took it with us. It was absolutely crawling with woodworm and was barely legible but I had to have it. We took it in the taxi that had to work it’s way through battling Latics and City fans. We eventually got to Aspull Civic Centre and I walked in to the wedding proudly with my new possession. Until my Mum saw me, bollocked me and made me put it in the bin. 😥 Sean Livesey

Greasy Snogs and Disco in 70’s Wigan

20 Jan

 

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(Photograph courtesy of Mick Pye and taken by his dad John)

The building is ugly but it has a tale or two to tell if you’d like to listen. To get there we move through the town centre past pie shops, Poundland and Primark until we reach a big cube of a place covered in sickly yellow tiles and bright red brickwork. The pavements round here are certainly not paved with gold but this unlikely looking venue once drew the youth of Wigan through its doors and left the rest of the town’s nightclubs fighting for the scraps.

Tiffany’s opened in the late 70’s and promised sophisticated entertainment for the over 21’s, well I suppose it was a little bit more upmarket than the usual late night haunts in town. Before Tiff’s we had places like Puffers and Blutos, smallish places that didn’t require any dress code especially Puffers/Pemps. I was also a regular at the Wigan Casino Rock Nights and once went there in a jumper I had slept in the night before. Bryan Ferry had nothing on me.

Tiff’s changed all that and initially split my group of mates in two. I suppose there was always an unseen diving line between us though we always got on well. Half the group would be in high waist many buttoned trousers with patterned shirt fitted over the top collar of their wide lapelled jackets or bombers and the other half would be in jeans, t-shirts and duffle or afghan.

I was in the t-shirt/jeans side of the equation. The differences were magnified on holidays that we took together when the trousers had one room and the jeans the other. The trouser gang took a bath and then used deodorant, a fact that amazed the jeans fraternity whose bottle of Hai Karate or Old Spice lasted from Christmas to Christmas. This combined with using hairdryers and brushes was ridiculed by us on the quiet but the facts are the nice smelling coiffured bunch seemed to get more women than us natural musk smelling scraggy haired lot.

When the trousers went to Tiff’s we initially refused to go but gradually the disco sirens calling to us from the yellow and red cube drew us to our funky fate. We procured the trousers, shopped for shirts, ditched the duffels and most importantly of all, got the tie. The tie was the key to the magic kingdom for without it your entrance was barred.

Now if you’re sat there imagining the jeans gang emerging like some lovely butterflies from denim cocoons think again. We looked like those Victorian photographs of old Wild West outlaws, after they had been killed; you know the ones, propped up on a board wearing an ill-fitting suit. We were as comfortable as a jelly on a bed of nails.

The tie was the worst bit, apart from Weddings, Funerals and job interviews we hadn’t worn one since our school days and it was the one item of clothing we were apt to forget. Tiff’s had a strict rule regarding ties, no tie no admittance and if you forgot your tie then you had to put your reserve plan into action.

This could include putting your belt round your neck and passing that off as a tie. This seemed plausible after 10 pints and your drinking partners would nod their approval as they groggily inspected your neckwear “Awreet that, corn’t tell it’s a belt” Alas such attempts were likely to end in failure unless the bouncers were myopic.

Allison Mason

(Membership card courtesy of Allison Mason)

By far the best substitute for a tie was the humble sock. Stretched out as far as it would go and then tied round the neck, pull your jacket up and together, push your neck down, keep one hand in your pocket to keep your pants from falling down and lift your shoulders up. Suave it wasn’t but it usually worked especially if you walked closely behind your tallest mate. The daft thing was once you got in the club you could take your tie/sock/belt off and nobody gave a monkey’s.

The place itself seemed massive and quite impressive but I was comparing it to Puffers with its tiny dance floor and barrels for tables. The dance area in Tiff’s was enormous and packed with women and Jason King lookalikes with shirts unbuttoned to the navel and enough chest hair to stuff a small sofa. Their moustaches could stuff the cushions.

In front of them was a stage and a DJ spinning the music which was purely D.I.S.C.O. Tiffany’s had a female Disc Jockey named Stella and I think she was a good looking girl but I never ventured up close enough to look at her and I didn’t think she’d play “Stairway to Heaven” if I asked her anyway. Up above the grooving gyrators was a spinning mirror ball casting a million stars around the room, kids this was the 70’s and all those clichés were right, well they were at Tiff’s.

Tables and chairs surrounded the dance floor and on the odd occasions I strutted my funky stuff it felt like you were being judged in a 70’s version of “Strictly” I can’t have a wee if the toilets are packed so if my version of the Hustle was a little wooden then that’s why. That’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it. Palm trees and Roman/Greek columns were dotted about the room and I’m pretty sure they were fake though that didn’t stop one of my mates trying to climb up a tree to see if they had coconuts.

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The stage was also the place where the resident group at Tiff’s played. They were called “Sunshine Cake” which sounds like something you might buy in the cafes of Amsterdam. I can’t tell you if they were any good but they must have been alright because I never noticed the switch between records and the live music. Mind you by the time they came on I was well oiled and probably chatting up a Roman column.

Three bars were set in the walls of the room and I remember the ale being bloody awful and if I’m not mistaken it was served in plastic glasses and went warm in a couple of minutes.  Tiff’s also had a snack area where you could buy chicken in a basket! I’d heard about this exotic dish from someone who had been to the world famous Batley Variety Club, what do you mean you’ve never heard of it?  The snack bar was ideal for a bowl of chips at around 1am and if you tapped up you could always impress your wench by sharing a chicken & chips basket. Oh those greasy snogs later!

Between the bars and the seating area was a walkway running all the way round the club. It was carpeted and before too long it was sticky from all the ale spilled on it. The one thing everyone remembered when I asked them about Tiff’s was this walkway. All night long people would walk round in a continuous circle; it was a never ending cavalcade of women mixed in with the odd Jason King pillock. My mate Paul Richardson said “It wer like hookin’ a duck at fair”.

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Despite the plastic palm trees, glitter balls and ancient plaster columns it never really won me over, it was all a bit too artificial and all those hairy chests and satin shirts didn’t help either. I can understand though if some people loved it and probably more couples met there and went on to get married than from anywhere else in town. I met the future Mrs TT there and at least four of my mates met their respective partners there too. The place must have had something about it but personally I put it down to the Old Spice and regular baths.

Tony Topping

 

Taking the Step

18 Jan

It’s only when you get older that you look back over your life and think “If only I’d taken that step” It could have been getting a different job, working harder at school, asking that pretty girl out, moving away from your home town and so on. Well if you didn’t take “that step” it’s too late now my friend and I’ll see you in the coffee shop ruminating over the clouds swirling slowly in your cup…

 

Back in the early eighties a good work friend of mine who made me laugh a lot and eased the tedium of factory toil, emigrated to Australia. I missed him a lot as work once again returned to the monotony it was before his arrival. Years earlier a girl I worked with in the same old factory emigrated to South Africa and left me with no warm smile to light up the gloom. I was briefly tempted to follow them, one way or another, and while I still had my youth, but I only climbed to the top stage in the swimming pool to look down and not to take that leap of faith.

 

In the mid 70’s a young man with a wife and children was given the chance to take that leap into the unknown and he soared. His name was Brent Atherton, a Wigan lad like me but unlike me he was good at something, that something being football.

 

Brent first came to the attention of the football scouts at the age of 18 after scoring 64 goals in the local Amateur League for the SS Club in Downhall Green. Blackburn Rovers moved in and Brent spent a season there playing in the A team but found it difficult to break through.

The following season Brent signed for Prescot Town and later joined Kirkby Town where he teamed up with the infamous Johnny King. In February 1971 Gordon Milne signed Brent for Wigan Athletic. Brent now lives in Australia and I managed to get in touch with him via his old friend Danny Dewhurst another ex Wiganer down under.

 

TT: The 70/71 team is my favourite Wigan Athletic side of all time. What was it like for you as a local lad to join such a successful side?

 

BA: It was a dream come true for me personally. Wigan Athletic were one of the biggest, probably the biggest non-league club in the country at the time. Gordon Milne was a top man and a top manager. The training under Gordon was a lot harder than I was used to but the morale and the atmosphere was fantastic. Kenny Banks was trainer and I have fond memories of him, lovely man.

 

What was it like to be amongst ex England players like Derek Temple and Gordon Milne for example?

 

Derek Temple was a great bloke and a fantastic player; it was a pleasure to be at the club. Gordon Milne was a real gentleman and of course he had a fantastic career. David Breen was another player who wasn’t always first choice but he was an extremely skilful player, very tricky. It was a very gifted squad and it was really difficult to break into the first team but I enjoyed every minute of my time at Wigan Athletic. Some of the other players who the fans might not recall but were very good Ron Melling and Ivor Swarbrick who played in the reserves with me.

 

Gordon Milne left the club and was replaced by Les Rigby

 

Yes that’s right and for one reason or another Les and I didn’t really get along together. Les had his favourites at the club and it was like a closed shop. I left the club and signed for Skelmersdale United. Skelmersdale were a good side back then. They were coached by Roy Rees a top coach and a great innovator. Roy managed the British Universities team and was also a coach with the F.A. He later coached in America having great success with the USA under 17’s team taking them to four U17’s World Cups and beating Brazil, Italy and Argentina.

 

There seemed to be a flux of good non-league players back then

 

Some very talented players who could have gone on to play at a higher level which some did of course. Steve Heighway had just left Skelmersdale when I arrived there. Alan Wolf was a cracking player at Skem too. Mickey Worswick was at Chorley when I played and he could easily have played at a higher level. Many others too many to mention but Johnny King was another top player. Dougie Coutts another latics favourite followed me to Skem as assistant coach to Roy Rees.

 

After appearing for clubs such as Kirkby Town, Wigan Athletic, Prescot Town, St Helens Town, Skelmersdale United and Ashton Town you received an offer too good to turn down I believe?

 

That’s right whilst playing for Skelmersdale I was approached by a scout from Perth Azzuri a club in Australia. I jumped at the chance to move and together with my wife and two children we set out on big adventure in 1977. The opportunity was too great to turn down and we never looked back after that, settling down here for good.

 

Did you feel under any pressure to justify your passage from the other side of the world?

 

No I was always confident in my ability and quite a few players made the same journey from Britain at the time. The players that emigrated helped raise the standards of football in Australia. Perth Azzuri was an Italian based club and they really looked after us. I quickly adapted to the heat and in fact preferred it to the harsh conditions we got in England from time to time. It was less stressful and we just embraced the lifestyle with open arms.

 

You had a very good career out there too

 

Yes Azzuri won two Championships while I was there. I was playing in midfield by then and I’ve always been fit so I was quite an energetic player. I later moved to Kelmscott United and was made captain there, well I had to pass the armband on to Sir Trevor Brooking when he arrived for a spell at the club but I said to him “I want it back when you’re gone!” He was a gentleman on and off the field. We won the Cup playing together in midfield that season.  In 1983 I moved to Forrestfield United and it was there that I won my greatest honour being voted the league’s Best Player Award and receiving the Gold Star on television. I’ve loved every minute of my career and been fortunate to play with or against Bobby Moore, Trevor Brooking, Alan Ball, Ted McDougall, Maurice Parkin ex Leeds/Sheff Utd, Peter Holt ex Rochdale and John Salton ex Dunfermline.

 

Thank you to Brent for agreeing to this interview, many thanks also to Danny Dewhurst for doing the actual interviewing* Danny also performed the laborious task of typing the emails out. Thank you gentlemen it’s been a pleasure.

 

Tony Topping

 

*I did want to go over and interview Brent myself but sadly my Mudhutter expenses didn’t stretch that far. Still if anyone wants interviewing in Scholes I can just about scratch enough together for that, sniff…

 

 

The History Man

11 Dec

The History Man

I went for my flu jab the other day at Boston House Surgery hey it’s free for codgers so I’m in. If they were giving away the Bubonic plague for free I’d be there, owt for nowt. Normally when I’m in this part of town I’m on my way to a match at the stadium and usually on the last minute but today I have all the time in the world. So what did I do with all this time? I went for a walk into the past yet again…

Up Springfield Road and down First Avenue for the first time in years. I walked slowly trying to conjure up misty memories from that terraced street which thankfully was empty and silent as the grave. All of us who ventured down that street to watch the latics at Springfield Park should pay a visit now and again especially if it’s been years since we last did it.

At the end of the Avenue the view of course has changed dramatically. New-ish houses populate what was once our pot holed pitted car park. A little gap allows you to cut through to the houses and then the ghosts appear. I’ll admit I was surprised by my reaction, a melancholy mood engulfed me and it was like visiting a graveyard where loved ones are interned.

I wandered about for a bit in the drizzle and made my way out via St Andrews Drive. Nothing indicates this was our former home apart from one lonely street sign Lyon Road. A nice tribute to a latics legend but could and should have been so much more. I’m about to move off when I notice something on the street name from across the road. On closer inspection it’s a sticker stuck over the “O” in LYON something to do with Wigan Warriors. How petty can they get? I spend the next couple of minutes making sure I get every bit of the crap from the sign.

It’s our history, our turf, our players and our people. Never forget that.

I’ve actually dipped my toe into the latics history waters and it’s an all consuming interesting frustrating hobby. We are lucky at Wigan to have some fantastic historians amongst our fans, Bernard Ramsdale, Andrew Werrill, Rod Prescott, Steve Halliwell, George Chilvers David Roughley (http://springfieldparkmemorial.weebly.com) and my good friend Paul Gallagher but one man who I always associate with Wigan Athletic and statistics is of course Jeff Rourke. From an early age I watched Jeff and his mates write notes down at Springfield Park. Glancing at watches, no doubt synchronised, and nodding sagely they would record every minutiae of the game.

If you want to know anything about Wigan Athletic Jeff is the man to see. Here is a little insight into our very own Jeff…

1ST GAME

I remember waiting at my local shops in Beech Hill with my Dad to catch a coach to go to Blackburn to see Latics play Chorley in the 1959 Lancashire Junior Cup Final. I don’t remember the game which is just as well as our local rivals hammered us 4-1. Still I was hooked.

INFAMOUS BRAWL

I remember a game in 1962 against Winsford United when the referee abandoned the match because the players were brawling. An angry crowd gathered outside the ground waiting for the referee to appear but he managed to dodge them by jumping over a wall at the other end of the ground. Latics were losing the game 2-1 at the time. 

SCRAPBOOKS

I was 14 when England won the World Cup and I kept a scrapbook of the occasion (and also for the next 7).  I began keeping scrapbooks of Wigan Athletic from season 1966/67 and have continued to do so every season since. 

MADNESS

In 1969, I remember going to Chorley on a Friday in order to catch a holiday coach going to Clacton-on-Sea. Latics were playing a pre-season friendly at Cambridge United and the coach went through Cambridge at 5am on the Saturday morning. It was worth it as Latics won 2-0 but I had to wait until midnight to catch the return coach back to Chorley.

WEMBLEY

Finally getting there in the 1973 FA Trophy Final against Scarborough but it ended in disappointment as the Seadogs won in extra time with a controversial offside goal. Staying behind after the game thinking I’d probably not come back here again – how wrong was I. 

FA CUP GIANT-KILLERS

Beating Jack Charlton’s Sheffield Wednesday in the FA Cup in 1977 – the 9th Football League scalp non-league Latics had taken. 

ELECTION AT LAST

Replacing Southport to finally gain election to the Football League in June 1978 after 34 failed attempts. What a night we had in the Supporters’ Club.

CAR CRASH

Travelling with mates back from a postponed game at Hartlepool in 1979, we got hit from behind while going through Leeds and our vehicle spun round in slow motion and ended up facing the wrong way – that was scary.

WRITING IN PROGRAMME

In 1982, asking Director Jack Farrimond, who was the first ever Latics Secretary in 1932, if I could write in the match-day programme.

GOT TRAVEL CLUB STARTED

After discovering Swansea had a Travel Club and we were paying over twice as much as them to travel,  I wrote to Latics Director Jim Bennett  in 1984 asking could we start one up and after two meetings in the Supporters’ Club – I was elected Secretary.

FIRST WEMBLEY TRIUMPH

Seeing captain Colin Methven lifting the Freight Rover Trophy after the 3-1 win over Brentford in 1985. I had a splitting headache all the game just wanting the victory so much. I didn’t even notice Mike Newell’s hand ball before scoring.

SON’S DESERTION

My son Steven, born in 1984 has not followed in my footsteps and after taking him on a trip around Old Trafford, he stayed a Manchester United fan but Latics are his second favourite club

RELEGATION/PROMOTION

Relegation to Division 3 was a major disappointment at the end of season 92/93

but then winning the Championship in the last game of season 96/97 more than made up for it especially as Fulham were beaten for the title by their own goals scored suggestion.

THE THREE AMIGOS

Watching Jesus Seba, Isidro Diaz and Roberto Martinez doing their matador goal celebrations and the fans’ flag that stated “Jesus is a Wiganer”.

CLOSURE OF SPRINGFIELD PARK

After 40 years, the thought of not standing on the popular side, hearing the dodgy tannoy system and missing all the great nights in the Supporters’ Club, my second home, was hard to imagine at first but we have all the memories.

MORE PROMOTION

Winning the Division 2 title with a massive 100 points in season 02/03 before missing out on the play-offs on the last day due to a West Ham last minute  equaliser in our first season in the Championship.  The  Premiership dream was realised the following season by finishing runners-up to Sunderland.

CARLING CUP FINAL

Reaching the final held at the Millenium Stadium before being beaten 4-0 by Manchester United. Knocking out Newcastle United and Arsenal along the way. 

SURVIVING IN THE PREMIERSHIP

Lasting eight seasons and playing a remarkable 304 Premiership games – winning 85, drawing 76 and losing 143 but all the big boys have been beaten at one point.

WINNING THE FA CUP

The bucket dream of every football supporter came true for  Latics fans just after 7pm on May 11th 2013 when Ben Watson’s superb last minute header won the coveted trophy, to become the 43rd different name engraved on the cup.

PLAYING IN EUROPE

Zulte-Waregem of Belgium, NK Maribor of Slovenia and Rubin Kazan of Russia provided the opposition with over 2,500 fans making the first trip to Bruges a fantastic spectacle.

I unfortunately travelled to Bruges through the club which was a big mistake, probably the last coach to get there but the first one back in Wigan – one of the biggest disappointments  I’ve had – even took Shearings to court over it.

 

Thanks to Jeff for the interview and it’s safe to say that our history is in good hands with our dedicated group of historians. See you in the history shop kids!

 

Tony Topping

P.S. If you know of any Wigan Athletic historians who deserve a mention here please let me know and I’ll update the post. Thanks

Another respected WAFC historian is Paul Rowley

 

What I did on my holidays

6 Oct

What I did on my Holidays 

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Hope you all had a great summer and the weather has been quite decent this year for a change. Mind you as I look out from the turret of Topping Towers it’s raining quite heavily as I type this. Now back when I was a youngster 300 years ago it was sunny every day of the school holidays and we would travel to foreign lands like Morecambe, Rhyl and New Brighton. What those dumps I hear you say? Now then don’t be so cheeky they were quite exotic and magical places in the 50’s and 60’s. Come on let’s travel back and take a look.

As a family our main holiday would tend to be Blackpool or Butlin’s but day trips out were an important part of the summer holidays especially Southport and it’s a thriving place today but I want to focus on the local seaside resorts that faded and died. New Brighton attracted thousands of people to its seashore in the 1960’s when I was a nipper. Hard to imagine if you visit the place today but once upon a time it rivalled Blackpool and had a bigger tower than the Fylde coast one.

The tower was a whopping 567 feet high! Built in 1900 it was dismantled in 1919 because the owners couldn’t afford to maintain it so they sold it for scrap. Six men were killed in the building of the tower and one fireman fell 90 feet to his death from a six inch wide beam trying to tackle a blaze. On one occasion a woman and her child had to spend the night up at the top of the structure after the lift closed. They didn’t even bother making a complaint when they were discovered the next morning. They were made of sterner stuff in those days.

The big draw for me about going to New Brighton was the journey to get there. Train from Wigan to Liverpool and then the walk through the city to the docks. Hustle and bustle, buildings so big they took your breath away, grime, smoke and tons of atmosphere. Then you got to the docks! Ships jostling for position, big and small all huffing and puffing, some bound for lands I had only read about like the Isle of Man! Our ship was only a smallish one, the New Brighton ferry, but for a little while I was Fletcher Christian on board The Bounty.

New Brighton had a decent funfair, not on a par with Blackpool but enough to keep kids entertained. The giant tower had long since disappeared before I was born but the massive tower building still stood and housed the Beatles more times than anywhere else bar The Cavern. It also had a massive outdoor swimming pool that hosted beauty contests. The Tower Building was destroyed by fire a recurring theme sadly throughout seaside demise.

The pier where you alighted from the ferry at New Brighton is long gone and you can no longer get there by boat. You can however get a ferry across the Mersey and walk the couple of miles to New Brighton along a flat promenade. It’s a pleasant trip on a nice day and you can hunt for the ghosts of former glories as you make your way there.

Not much of Morecambe’s glories remain I’m sad to say but it was similar to New Brighton in the 50’s and 60’s. Funfair, giant open air swimming pool, theatres and all the trimmings of a jolly day out. Morecambe even had its own version of SeaWorld with a dolphin show in the 1960’s and I vaguely remember going unless my minds playing tricks. It definitely had an old sailing ship moored there and I went on it. The ship was used in the films Treasure Island and Moby Dick and it was a classic old vessel but sadly it was destroyed by fire in the early seventies.

Moby Dick

Moby Dick

Morecambe used to be known as “Little Bradford” because of the Yorkshire folk who travelled there by train. The funfair at Morecambe which opened in 1906 underwent many changes not least in 1987 when it was remarketed as “Frontierland” a Western style theme park with the same rides tarted up. It wasn’t a success and in 2000 it was closed down with all the rides finding new homes apart from the Polo Tower which was left standing. I’m surprised that tower didn’t find a buyer after all it must have made a mint! Geddit? Mint? Polo? Oh please yourselves.

More indignity was heaped on Morecambe when in 1994 Crinkly Bottom or Blobbyland opened its doors. The ahem brainchild of Noel Edmonds it closed 13 weeks after opening due to a disinterested public and lost 2 million pounds from the local council funds. Colin Crompton of Wheeltappers and Shunters fame once said of Morecambe “There are some nice drives out of Morecambe. ANY road out of Morecambe is a nice drive”

Before I move onto the seaside resort of Rhyl I thought I would give you a flavour of what it was like to be a kid in the 1960’s on a day trip. If it was a sunny most of the day would be spent on the beach. Kids in cossies Mum’s and Dad’s in casual attire with the occasional showing of white flesh when they roused themselves to go paddling in the sea or swimming in the open air pools. Granddad would be in his former best suit now relegated to knocking about wear with sandals and socks plus flat cap. Grandma would be resplendent in summer frock with overcoat and hat.

Every adult had a deckchair while kids sat on the sand or scurried about getting water for the sandcastle moat a pointless task since it disappeared immediately. Butties from home would be opened on the beach and be guaranteed to be sandblasted in seconds giving a gritty texture to your corned beef butty. Buckets and spades were made of tin that rusted as soon as you got them home. Cowboy hats for boys and frilly fringed hats for girls were the de rigour at the seaside. Tin pots of tea filled with scalding water were entrusted with children to carry over a landscape filled with semi naked bodies. We loved it!

Rhyl was one of the few day trips that evolved into a week’s holiday and I stayed here twice both times at the Sunnyvale Camp. The camp opened in the 1920’s and is still going today but the open air swimming pool that I splashed about in is long gone. Hard to believe that Rhyl was a booming tourist destination back in the day but it’s another of those places that has fell on hard times. Not hard to see why when tourism is your biggest asset. Thankfully the town is getting back on its feet now and I may have to revisit the place for a fresh view.

Rhyl 1960's

In 1962 Rhyl made history by having the world’s first hovercraft passenger service from the resort to Wallasey. It started ferrying (or should that be hovering?) passengers in July that year but it wasn’t a success due to mechanical problems and stopped its service in September 1962. The resort had a decent funfair named Ocean Beach a cracking name reminiscent of American theme parks and another funfair at the Marine Lake. Good theatres, a pier, open air swimming pool, nice beach and lovely countryside nearby all added to the appeal of the place but it just didn’t resonate with me that much really.

Other notable day trips in the summer holidays included trips to Belle Vue funfair and zoo, the Lake District, Chester and the zoo, Southport, Blackpool and still one of my most favourite places in the world Lytham St Annes. I hope you’ve enjoyed this nostalgic trip, don’t forget your sticks of rock and bars of nougat and I’ll see you on the steam train home!

Tony Topping

25 Years of Junior Latics (2008)

4 Aug

25 years of Junior Latics

We worry about what a child will become tomorrow, yet we forget that he is someone today.  ~Stacia Tauscher

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2008 was the 25th anniversary of Wigan Junior Latics, 25yrs of looking after the lifeblood of this club, playing a vital role in the history of Wigan Athletic yet taken for granted by the powers that be. That I hasten to add is my own personal view, feel free to disagree but I have seen them treated harshly in our rapid rise through the leagues. Homeless and unattached they wander from venue to venue whilst the corporate big wigs jostle for position at the Premiership trough.

Yes we know they contribute some of the money but as the saying goes all that glistens is not gold. The ones who are really precious are outside shivering by a bus or standing in a broken down nightclub or if their really lucky in a nearby gym. The adults who give up their time freely to look after and organise these children do so stoically, the show must go on and it does thanks to them and no none else. My own two children now young adults were both fortunate enough to be picked out as mascots. My daughter led the team out against Millwall at Wembley in 1999 and my son v Gillingham at Springfield Park on a cold barren Tuesday night. Two very different occasions but both of them were precious to me and the kids. A quarter of a century ago things seemed very different to me, was I looking back through rose tinted glasses? To find out I managed to get in touch with someone who was there in those early days, Laurence Fairhurst all round nice guy and lifelong latics fan agreed to talk to me about our junior member’s organisation.

When did you become involved in the Junior Latics? How did JL start up?

I first became involved in 1985 two years after the organisation was set up. My son Barry was playing for the Junior Latics U10’s and I was asked if I would like to help out. Jack Sudworth started the whole thing off after seeing how well Man City’s Junior Blues was doing.

Did you get any help financially back in those early years?

Yes we got help from Port Petroleum and Heinz amongst others. Heinz were especially good with us.

Were the senior players at Wigan Athletic initially keen to attend events?

The players were very good especially when we were based at Springfield Park. We had the likes of Neil Rimmer, Alan Tankard, Roberto Martinez and Stuart Barlow turning up on a regular basis but they all were very keen. Bryan Hamilton was especially good when he was manager and he would have the players on a rota to attend our meetings. Dave Philpotts was another one who made sure the players knew their responsibilities with regards to the kids. It’s a little bit harder nowadays to get close to the players but Jimmy Bullard was always brilliant when he was here.

When did you first start watching the latics? Who was your favourite player?

In 1959/60 a Lancashire Cup game. My Dad liked to watch the rugby but like many others in those days he also watched the latics especially in the cup. After a while I started to make my own way there. My favourite player would have to be Harry Lyon. He wasn’t the most skilful player I have seen but he knew where the net was! 60 goals in a season, it’s not bad is it? He would run through a brick wall if you asked him. He was a great character who liked a pint and always had time for a chat.

Did any of the latics players kids ever become members of Junior Latics?

Stuart Barlow’s little lad Josh became an honorary member but no other players children ever joined. Arjan DeZeeuw’s was at one meeting and he was so impressed that he asked us if his own children could attend the event. After we said yes he nipped home straight away to bring them down.

Who were the worst away Juniors to visit Wigan?

Oh Preston North End definitely! Around 72 of them turned up at Springfield Park on a double decker bus for one match. They only had two adults to look after the lot of them! We usually played football etc on the all weather pitch but it was unavailable on this particular day so we herded them all into the supporters club. They were wild, running about everywhere while their “minders” were drinking at the bar. Eventually Carol Liptrot could take no more and we had to put them in the family enclosure. They started to wreck that and we had to get the stewards to march them to the away end. Undeterred they went on to smash an emergency exit door down!

Which ground was the best to visit with the Junior Latics?

I would have to say Rotherham United. We had a great relationship with them and always got a warm welcome whenever we visited Millmoor. They always organised events for the adults as well as the children and they put on fantastic buffet’s etc.

Without doubt the best away trip we had.

What happened to the little caravan that used to be near the supporters club at Springfield Park?

Stuart Roy Clarke

Image by Stuart Roy Clarke from thehomesoffootball.co.uk

Ah the little caravan was eventually sold for £5! The trouble was it was always getting vandalised even though we never kept anything valuable in it. You would get a phone call from Norma (Sherratt) saying “They’ve been in it again” Shame really as it was an iconic symbol in its own little way. We used to take it to carnivals all over the northwest and it was great for raising the profile of our club.

Many of those Junior Latics members have gone on to have families of their own now. It must be heart warming to see their kids coming through.

Funnily enough I was at a game a little while back and I was waiting in the tunnel with the mascots when one of the Dads said “I remember the day when I was the mascot” It’s great to see that continuality, we must have been doing something right!

Finally do you miss Springfield Park?

I do miss the old ground. We had some great times in the old supporters club and it was a very sad day when we had to leave. We managed to get a last look at the club before it was torn down, sad but we have some great memories to look back on.

Thanks to Laurence and his lovely wife Therese for their hospitality. They invited me and the wife up to their home and were terrific company. They are immensely proud of Wigan Athletic and remain humble about the role they played in cultivating our junior members. The same work goes on today though the name of our junior club has changed. I can’t help feeling that the more we have progressed the more we have forgot about our roots. That somehow as supporters we are less valued than we once were, there’s a distance now that seems to be growing. Children are the lifeblood of any club and Wigan Athletic need to recognise this. They need a permanent home in the stadium on a match day. The family stand is a lonely place nowadays, marketing brains better than mine need to look at this and set about filling it. The saying “Look how far we have come” seems to be a mantra emanating from the stadium. Maybe they should be saying “Look how far we have yet to go”

Tony Topping

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Northern Love Story

8 Mar

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Music, where would we be without it? It weaves its way throughout our lives and transports us back to moments that you can almost touch. I was into rock music when I was one of the young dudes and in the mid 70’s I could be found going to concerts in Manchester & Liverpool and the odd Reading Festival. If I wasn’t trying to catch Barbara’s eye outside of “Puffers” then I would be in the Wigan Casino playing air guitar to the likes of Deep Purple and colliding quite deliberately with “Joni” the beautiful tiny dancer on the sprung wooden dance floor. Denim jacket in summer, Duffel in winter, I would knock back those Newky Browns and try and forget I had a shitty job in a factory, and I did forget for a little while…

Outside the Casino young lads and girls queued patiently, they had the same dreams, the same crap jobs and like me they lived for the weekend.

The soundtrack to their lives couldn’t have been more different though and it was one that was alien to me. When our evening was over we left to a barrage of insults from the “soulies” The feeling was mutual, we were the same ages but belonged to different tribes and as we made our way home I would often turn and wonder what they did at those “Allnighters”

Years later I discovered that I had missed something special, something that happened every week in my home town. While I slept and dreamt of Joni the world was spinning to the sound of Northern Soul…

Thankfully Northern Soul is still with us today and is in fact enjoying a renaissance. Soul nights are popping up everywhere and people are flocking to them. One of the best local events is held at the St James Club in Orrell. Martin Blundell & Andy Garside both DJ and arrange events at the Orrell Soul Club and I asked them about the continuing fascination with the scene and about their football allegiances.

How old were you when you first got into Northern Soul and what influenced you?

Martin: I was 12 and in my 2nd year at Upholland Sec. A couple of lads who I’d got friendly with at school suggested going down to the YMCA which was behind the Rezzies (Orrell Water Park now). We’d only gone down there for a game of snooker and darts to pass the time but they had a DJ on in the next room playing different sorts of music. I remember hearing Edwin Starr’s Back Street wafting in through the gap in the door and thinking how good it sounded, so I went and had a look. There were about 20 people in there dancing, clapping in tune to the music and of course doing spins, kick ups, etc. Their energy just blew me away, together with the fact that they looked so cool in their full-length leathers and shiny cherry red Casino Diamonds. It didn’t really hit me right then, but I was about to be hooked.

Andy: I was 14 years old when I first visited the Wigan Casino but I had been listening to my sister’s records for a few years before that so I did get my early influence from her.

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What clubs did you visit and which one was your favourite? Was the drugs scene in the 70’s overstated or was it quite common?

Martin: I’d go pretty regularly to the YMCA and got to know the DJ. We’d call him Stretch Cartwright (after the rubber toy of the time) ‘coz he was just so supple. I often wondered how he avoided knocking his own head off when he did a kick up. Not long after he started a Wednesday night session at St James Club where we now hold Orrell Soul Club and I was a regular there until I was 15. Then I started going to the Wigan Casino. Sadly this was at the expense of the St James’ night because Wigan had an early session on the Wednesday which quite a few us started to go to. Friday was another early session too and that became a regular night for us. I was 16 and just started working when I first went to an allnighter and up to that point I’d never come across any of the drug scene at all, although I’d heard about it from one or two who had been there before me. The only real contact I had with drugs was through a few friends who dabbled, as I never got involved in it myself. One mate in particular though did get pretty embroiled in it and as result went his separate ways. I’d heard a few years ago that he ended up in rehab a few times, but that’s as much as I found out.

Andy: The clubs I went to were quite local to us such as the White Swan in Huddersfield, the Underground Club in Leeds and Samantha’s in Sheffield. There was the Casino of course and numerous others that we visited. The Casino was the obvious Favourite. As for the drugs, well it was just part of the scene in those days; it did get a bit out of hand towards the end of the Casino though.

How much of a role does fashion play in the scene? Was getting up to dance a daunting prospect in the beginning? Did you practise at home first?

Martin: Back in the days of our youth, the fashion was a pretty important part of the scene. I can remember getting the train to Manchester to buy a full length leather coat simply because I just had to have one to feel a part of it. Same goes for the shoes, I had two pairs of Diamonds which I’d always have polished up for whenever I went out. Some of the girls in particular always looked the business and I imagine they spent hours getting themselves looking like that. There’s still a lot of it around on today’s scene too, there’s a couple of specialist manufacturers who produce the bags, pegs and skirts of the day. You’ll see quite a few people in the fashion whenever you’re at a soul event.

I started learning the dancing pretty early on when I went to the youth club and St James and through watching the lads there and picking up a lot of their moves. I soon found out though that it was about having your own style, a way in which you could feel the music and move to it. And then of course, knowing when the right time was to clap, kick or spin, etc. Having got friendly with most people there, it was quite acceptable for me to be making a complete idiot of myself while I learned. A few of us were always round each others houses dancing around the living room and commenting on each others moves. By the time I got to the Casino I’d had a few positive comments about my dancing so it wasn’t quite as daunting as it could have been. The thing that got my nerves going the most was the fear of bumping into other people on the dance floor as I’d never experienced such a packed hall before. (I still regularly have a little soul night in my living room at home nowadays, after a few beers you understand)

Andy: I personally don’t think Fashion is as important as it used to be. As for the dancing well it took me five visits to the Casino before I plucked up enough courage to get out on the dance floor. I think most people practised their moves at home to some degree.

 

Is the scene still popular? Does it attract any youngsters? What kind of atmosphere can a newcomer to the scene expect? How long has the Orrell club been going?

Martin: I’d say the scene is more popular now than it was at anytime back then mainly due to the fact that it’s not as much of an underground scene anymore so it’s more accessible to the general public as well as people reliving what they class as the best years of their lives. Some weekends you can choose between 50 and 60 events that are on throughout the country and there are always at least 2 or 3 within 25 miles of Wigan. It causes problems for events, as the punters are spread out so the event can be a little down in numbers. However, atmosphere at any event is always friendly and enjoyable. As a result there are quite a few younger people on the scene, mainly relatives of older soulies but the numbers are increasing slowly.

As Orrell Soul Club run by Andy, in its current form, it’s just over 18 months old. However, the club itself was run prior to this as “For Dancers Only” club and was pretty lively for 5 years. It comes as quite a surprise to a lot of the punters now that, historically, it opened its doors to Northern Soul for the first time in 1975. This was held on a Wednesday evening but started to suffer as a result of the Casino’s early session that night. As a result, in 1977, the event ended. Due to a bit of pressure from a number of people I took over the DJ spot and switched the night to a Sunday once a month. The last night I recall during that era was in 1980; I’d moved out of the area and couldn’t keep it going and as far as I know that was that until 7 years ago.

Andy: I think the scene is more popular today than it’s ever been and we are getting youngsters through the doors. Newcomers can expect to get a warm friendly welcome and have peace of mind that they will never get any trouble at soul venues.

Orrell has been running about 7 years now, I have been the promoter for the last 2 of those years and we are still growing.

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What are your views on “Modern Soul”? Do you like other kinds of music? Are your children into the scene?

Martin: Modern Soul has a massive following, so its appeal is obvious. Personally, I wouldn’t chase after it but I’ve been to many places where it is played and the dance floor reaction tells its own story. I’m oldies mon so I’ll keep my mouth shut on this subject! I like doo-wop music, which is probably not a shock as it’s inherently linked to early soul but I don’t really get much chance to listen to other genres. The kids have their music, which occasionally appeals in passing but nothing really that grabs me like Soul does. I have three daughters who have been brought up in a house where Northern Soul has always been played during their lives. When they were younger they’d sing along and dance to it in their own way. Now they’re older, they have their own tastes in music but they still occasionally attend the odd event and will get up on the dance floor to certain tunes they like and remember.

Andy: I’m of the old school and don’t think there’s a place for Modern Soul on the Northern Scene. I like all types of music but love my Northern and rare soul. My children? They think Northern is for old people!

Are you still discovering tracks that excite you today? Can you remember the first record you bought? What’s the most you have paid for a record? How many records have you?

Martin: It’s probably more a case of re-discovering tunes really. Something that I’ve not heard for 30+ years. Particularly with regard to the mid or slower tempo tunes. When I was younger, it was 100mph stuff that got me up on the dance floor with a complete ignorance towards any of the slower stuff. Now that I’ve mellowed (a bit) I’m finding myself appreciating those tunes that I would have quickly sat down to in the past. The first record I bought was Edwin Starr’s Back Street on the US Ric-Tic label, way back in those Orrell YMCA days. I’ve still got it and it still remains my favourite record as does Edwin Starr my favourite singer. I paid £240 for a copy of The Isonics, Sugar on the Kammy label about 6 months ago. Going back ten or so years I had well over 1500 records but personal circumstances meant selling quite a few and my list currently ends at 572.

Andy: I’m still finding tracks I’ve never heard or can’t remember hearing. I think the first record I ever bought was the Tempos – Countdown Here I Come on the Canterbury label. I try to limit myself to around the 100 to 200 pounds mark but have gone as high as £400 in the past. I work towards limiting my collection to around 600 records if it goes over that figure I start to move them on.

 

Do DJ’s always use vinyl? Have you a favourite track? Any particular DJ that you admired?

Martin: The answer to that is ‘NO’. I visited a venue a number of years ago where our world renowned Mister Wigan Casino (Russ) was Special Guest and he turned up with a large case of CD’s to play out. Orrell has an OVO (Original Vinyl Only) theme which can make it a little more difficult to find the right DJ’s but as a result we’ve had some brilliant guests over the last 18 months. All time favourite track as mentioned before is Back Street by Edwin Starr. One that currently gets me flying to the dance floor is Baby Can’t You See by Little Tommy. (Anyone got one on the US Sound Of Soul label that they’d like to sell me for, errm, let’s say a tenner?)I’d never really given much thought to particular DJ’s back then and therefore don’t really have any particular favourites. However, I can’t let this opportunity go without a mention for Nige Brown, one of the top guys on the current scene today. He has a great taste in music, a collection of records to die for and an attitude that is so infectious you can’t fail to enjoy his work.

Andy:. Favourite track has to be Eugene Jefferson – Pretty Girl Dressed In Brown on the Open label. Butch has to be the DJ I admire most he is one of the few still moving the scene forward.

Have you been to the “Soul in the Sun” events and what are they like? How often do you DJ/attend events?

Martin: I’ve been to the three November SITS events that have been held in Lanzarote. It’s based around the idea that a Soulie on a general holiday abroad has nowhere to go in the evening to satisfy their Soul fix. During the day, it’s do as you please, laze around in the sun, whatever and then every night you’ve got your soul satisfaction instead of your evening with Elvis karaoke. I’ve enjoyed every one I’ve been too and it is exactly what it says on the tin… “A Holiday With Soul”.

I’m out every weekend visiting an event, usually Saturday but sometimes on a Friday too. Mainly local events within a 25/30 mile radius but also other ‘big’ events, Stoke Allnighter, Skegness Weekender, etc. I’ve always loved Orrell so the 2nd Saturday of every month I’m always there, even more so now I’ve got a bit of a regular DJ spot (Thanks Andy!). As a result of DJ’ing at Orrell plus the fact that I’m relatively new back behind the decks, I’ve had a few bookings at other events as a guest and have been asked to go back again.

Andy: I went to soul in the sun in the early days and it’s very good as a social event but not my cup of tea. I am either DJ’ing or visiting other venues every week; it’s what I work all week for.

Favourite venues apart from Orrell?

Martin: No doubt that my second fave is Burscough Legion which runs on the 4th Saturday of every month. It’s a really friendly atmosphere and there’s always a good line-up of DJ’s that play something a little different, tunes you don’t hear often, a bit of R&B, etc. I’ve also enjoyed the Stoke Allnighter at Kings Hall as it’s probably the closest replica of the Casino that’s been found. A few others worthy of mention would be Southport St Theresa’s, Bury Masonic and The Monaco Ballroom for its atmosphere.

Andy: Has to be Keele best all-nighter in the country in my opinion.

How long have you supported your team? How did you first get into watching them?

Martin: I was about 6 when I started watching Latics. My Dad worked in the Car Parts shop on the corner of Gidlow Lane opposite the Pagefield Hotel and on Saturdays my Mam would help him out. I’d go with them until my Grandfather turned up to take me shopping. He’d be shopping for my auntie as well and we’d take it back to her house, which was at the top of Woodhouse Lane. She’d cook us a bit of dinner and along with my Uncle Alf we’d go the match.

Andy: I was 11 years old when I first went to Leeds Road to watch town. My older Brother Tony used to take me with his friends, that was the beginning of my life long love affair with Huddersfield Town

 

Favourite player?

Martin: I’d have to give a mention to Colin Methven for his reliability and solidity in the centre of defence. Although I didn’t get to many games during that era, he always stood out as a huge influence on the team and when you think of Mister Wigan Athletics, he would have to be up there. However, we always prefer excitement don’t we, so I’ll go for Nathan Ellington, while also giving credit for that to Jason Roberts. As an individual, ‘Duke’ had the ability to get me on the edge of my seat like no other has, before or since. No matter where he was on the pitch when he received the ball, the anticipation rose. He scored some fantastic goals during his time at the club, culminating, probably fittingly, with his header that confirmed promotion to the Premier League. Of course, what came to pass after that has been documented many times but let’s just remember the good times.

Andy: That would be Frank Worthington.

Best memory?

Martin: It’s difficult to pick one from the distant past as I was only young and although I enjoyed being there, I’d to some degree been given little option, either  Latics or getting whacked round the ear for causing mischief at the back of a car accessory shop. And a lot of the highs in between were experienced second hand to some degree. So, I’d have to say the two promotion seasons in 2002/3 and 2004/5, probably the latter being the greater high but only because it’s the last one.

Andy: Going to the old Wembley stadium with Town for the first time. 

Worst memory?

Martin: Finding out that Dave Whelan broke his leg in a Cup Final! No, seriously, I’d have to say the last game I went to with my Grandfather. He’d been ill for quite a while but the realisation after seeing him struggling and admitting he couldn’t cope, was a sad one. He still supported the club afterwards by sending some money with my uncle to buy lottery tickets on match days.

Andy: Missing out on promotion to the Premier league thanks to our then chairman Barry Rubery selling Marcus Stewart to one of our biggest rivals.

 

Did you take your children to games and do they still go now?

Martin: It was the Division Two promotion season and out of the blue my youngest daughter, Maddie, asked to get involved with the Junior Latics Girls. As a result of her interest, I started to take her regularly to a few games. The following season Fran, the 2nd daughter, started to come as well. During that year, Maddie won an award as “Most Improved Player” and at the presentation I found out that one of the other girls parents attended Soul events. They invited me with them and I’ve been out almost every weekend since. They only came to about half of last years games as the teenage female hormones took over a bit but they still have interest.

Andy: No never, they both support Man Utd!

 

What Northern Soul song do you think the team should run out to?

Martin: I like the thought of Bunny Sigler’s Follow Your Heart. Although the song itself refers to relationship difficulties, it pleads for heartfelt decision making in doing the right thing. Which of course we’d all like to think our players do for the club. Don’t they?

Andy: Otis Clay – The Only Way Is Up

 

Do you prefer your old ground to your new one?

Martin: The DW is reasonably impressive but unfortunately no matter what little intricate designs you put into the stadia, they all feel the same. I’d have preferred it if Springfield Park had been developed thoughtfully as there was so much history there.

Andy: Always, never liked the new ground.

 

Thank you to Martin and Andy for taking time out to do the interview. This interview was originally published in the Mudhutter in 2010 but the northern soul nights continue to be held at Orrell for more info check out Soul@StJames Orrell on Facebook.

 

 

Tony Topping